Tag Archives: composers desktop project

CDP Interface Tool Installation Guide (for Renoise)

CDP is Composer’s Desktop Project, a sound design tool with tons of different programs for manipulating and processing sounds. A while ago, developers have generously decided to make it free and soon after, Afta8 and Djeorek on Renoise forums made a great tool for using it inside Renoise. (Thanks again guys!) I have done many tutorials covering it, but not one for setting it up – until now! (This is for Windows & Mac, see this post on Renoise blog for Linux.)

So let’s get down to it. I’ll try to keep this simple & concise.

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VS 23: Combining Two Approaches

Hello everyone. Today, I’ll try to demonstrate how combining two simple approaches can easily create a more refined or sophisticated output. This is something I’ve noticed over time: Trying too hard inside a certain workflow can be counter-productive after some point and sometimes it’s much easier and effective to mix things up a little. The two elements I’m talking about here are the standard sampler options in Renoise and a couple simple CDP processes. So, let’s get started.

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Vorpal Sounds 11

Hi. I realized most of my sounds turn out to be on the darker side of things so this week I’ve chosen a more positive vibe to begin with. This sound is from BluMarTen’s fantastic sample pack: JungleJungle. It’s a great collection, and it’s free, so make sure you grab it if you haven’t already.

First thing I intend to do here is shaping the envelope of the sound. Doing that before you start processing can help achieve interesting results. And for that I just reverse the sound and fade out the ending a little. CDP has similar functionality but this time I just went for Renoise as it’s much faster.

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Vorpal Sounds 10

Hi. Last week, Sonniss.com posted a pack of 10GB+ high-quality game audio samples. I haven’t gone through all yet but there are some nice sounds in there, so check it out if you’re interested.

Anyhow, this episode’s starting sound is a zipper sample straight out of that pack.

To get things going, I’m using one of my sound design workhorses in CDP, blur. It transforms the zipper sample into a sweet textural sort of sound. The “points” & “overlap” settings help with defining and controlling the details of the blurry motion. There are no rules here, as far as I can understand, so I just go by trial & error when setting them.

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VS 8: Pre-Enveloping

Hello. Pre-enveloping. Silly term right? You’ll hopefully see (and hear) what I’m talking about soon. I didn’t have a specific goal in mind this week but as I was messing around, I got lucky and came up with a concept. And a sound of course.

And here’s how it started. A random sample taken from a field recording I’ve made a while ago. It’s a short metallic hit. No big deals here.

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VS4: A Handful of Snares

Hi. I’m back with another tutorial. I’ve been making quite atmospheric sounds for the first three episodes so I wanted to mix things up a little in this 4th part.

So let’s get down to it. This time we’ll be using a snare drum sample. Nice and simple:

One of my all time favourite sound creation technique has to be making lengthy random sounds and picking the good moments by chopping them up. The great thing about this approach is, using long-term random movements can yield a lot of happy accident moments that you can’t usually produce otherwise. For me, it’s been an endless source material for a huge variety of sounds. (Basses, atmospherics, hits, fx etc.)

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Vorpal Sounds 3

Hi. I’ve been a little busy with some construction work in the studio lately but being almost done with it, I figured I could make a new post.

I have been abusing “fastconv” in the last 2 posts so I wanted to change things up using “vocode” under the category “formants” this time. Now I’m not very well acquainted with the technical details of the CDP process as usual but vocoding is traditionally used for talking synth-like effects (Kraftwerk, Daft Punk, etc.) Nowadays they seem to make a comeback to process and mangle all sorts of different sounds and get unexpected timbres.

So I was hoping to go for that kind of effect. My 1st sound was a random field recording I’ve done with my Zoom H4n. I don’t exactly remember what the object was but it’s basically a random metallic hit. I believe I’ve transposed it down 6 semitones beforehand.

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