Tag Archives: cdp

Vorpal Sounds 10

Hi. Last week, Sonniss.com posted a pack of 10GB+ high-quality game audio samples. I haven’t gone through all yet but there are some nice sounds in there, so check it out if you’re interested.

Anyhow, this episode’s starting sound is a zipper sample straight out of that pack.

To get things going, I’m using one of my sound design workhorses in CDP, blur. It transforms the zipper sample into a sweet textural sort of sound. The “points” & “overlap” settings help with defining and controlling the details of the blurry motion. There are no rules here, as far as I can understand, so I just go by trial & error when setting them.

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VS 9: Layering

Hi. Layering is a quite important concept in sound design and it’s not something I’ve covered much yet. There are two reasons for that. First I’m not very good at it :-) Second, it’s something I usually do in context.

I think the second point is interesting as I prefer any kind of sample to be quite stripped down and basic, so that I can layer, process and tweak as necessary inside a track’s context. But general trend seems to be on the opposite side: People seem to want really “produced” and “full” sounding stuff.

Nevertheless, I still plan to stay on the building block approach most of the times. But this week we’ve got some layering to do. Not to get a super produced sound, but to make it a bit more interesting.

All right, that’s too much talk already. This week’s journey through sound begins with a clip that I’ve sampled from an old record.

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VS 8: Pre-Enveloping

Hello. Pre-enveloping. Silly term right? You’ll hopefully see (and hear) what I’m talking about soon. I didn’t have a specific goal in mind this week but as I was messing around, I got lucky and came up with a concept. And a sound of course.

And here’s how it started. A random sample taken from a field recording I’ve made a while ago. It’s a short metallic hit. No big deals here.

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Vorpal Sounds 7

Hi. Last week I’ve barely touched the greatness that’s quite uninspiringly called “spec-magnify” so this week I’d like to revisit this awesome function.

“Spec-magnify” uses some clever spectral tricks (just guessing) to sustain any kind of sound for as long as you want. It seems to evolve slightly over time so the results can be very convincing. A great thing to have in your arsenal as there’s so much you can do with these kind of sounds when you add some volume, filter and pitch movement. And we’ll just do that in a most basic way for this tutorial.

The sample we’ll be processing is a little field recording from my Zoom H4n again. It’s just a basic rustling sound coming from pebbles or something. It’s short but duration is irrelevant for this process.

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VS 6: Incidental Sounds

Hello. In this episode of Vorpal Sounds, we’ll have a go at making some incidental sounds. My definition isn’t probably very accurate but the idea of an incidental sound for me is something that’s not really musical but still supports the track’s structure by adding a little bit of freeform texture or ambience. I’m fascinated by these type of sounds but being overly analytical, I usually struggle to just pull some random samples into a song. So this sort of process is something that can sometimes yield cool results for that purpose.

Right, let’s get started now. The sample here is a little snippet from a movie. It’s short but has a nice mix of atmospherics and foley.

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Vorpal Sounds 5

Hello. This week, I have a little shorter single step walkthrough. Last time I had this simple concept where I added random movement to a basic sound, chop it up and use the good bits. This time it’s the same thing with a little twist: Instead of adding it randomly, I’m picking a sound that already has lots of movement and using that to produce various samples that can be used together; in this case a percussion kit. Well, almost.

Here’s the sound we’re using this week. Some sample I’ve taken randomly from an old record.

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VS4: A Handful of Snares

Hi. I’m back with another tutorial. I’ve been making quite atmospheric sounds for the first three episodes so I wanted to mix things up a little in this 4th part.

So let’s get down to it. This time we’ll be using a snare drum sample. Nice and simple:

One of my all time favourite sound creation technique has to be making lengthy random sounds and picking the good moments by chopping them up. The great thing about this approach is, using long-term random movements can yield a lot of happy accident moments that you can’t usually produce otherwise. For me, it’s been an endless source material for a huge variety of sounds. (Basses, atmospherics, hits, fx etc.)

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